Tiny statues around Budapest: hidden gems with big stories

It is worth looking for Kolodko's tiny statues because each has a meaningful story, which you will understand if you find them.

Almost everyone in Budapest knows about Kolodko's tiny statues. Those magnificent, detailed art pieces remember important stories and bring back old memories.

Tiny statues around Budapest: hidden gems with big stories

It is worth looking for Kolodko’s tiny statues because each has a meaningful story, which you will understand if you find them.

Almost everyone in Budapest knows about Kolodko’s tiny statues. Those magnificent, detailed art pieces remember important stories and bring back old memories. The hidden gems can be found not only in the central city but in villages too.

Mihály Kolodko is a Hungarian-Ukrainian artist who has lived in Hungary since 2017. Initially, he created large public sculptures, but as time passed, he expressed his art and message in small statues. And this is not just a metaphor; they are so minor that if you want to check them, you must be sure where to look – literally.

Kolodko’s tiny statues

For Mihály Kolodko, a statue is “the loudest art of silent expression.” The artist, born in 1978, Úzhgorod, graduated from Lviv Academy of Arts in 2002. He was always fascinated by the large forms, but he became more familiar with the city miniature format, so he began to create tiny masterpieces in 2010. His unique art and way of thinking made him well known in Hungary and worldwide.

If you visit Hungary by plane, you can bump into a Kolodko mini-statue when you arrive. On Franz Liszt Airport there is a metal version of Franz Liszt, the composer sitting on a marble.

Statues in Buda

In Buda, there are nine tiny statues close to each other. You can find all of them by walking just a few kilometres from Széll Kálman square to Döbrentei square.

For example, it is worth checking Mekk Elek, the “handyman” in Széll Kálmán square, a fictional character from a Hungarian muppet series. And also, you can take a look at the mini dog statues from the “There was once a dog fair in Buda” tale at Batthyány street 26.

On the way, you can find a miniature pull-up Trabant near Margit-bridge, and a tiny tank on the banks of the Danube at Bem Quay commemorating the 1956 revolution.

Not so far from them is the worm from The Great Angler cartoon series, which was popular in the ’80s. It can bring luck to the fishermen, even though it always escaped from the fishing rod in the cartoon. You can also find it on Bem Quay.

If you look around, a Rubik-cube statue appears near Batthyány Square. This puzzle toy draws attention to the creator, Ernő Rubik. He is a worldwide known Hungarian inventor and designer.

During this short, lovely walk, you can find even the rabbit with checkered ears. It is also a heartwarming Hungarian cartoon, and the main character examines the city with a telescope next to the castle tunnel in Buda at the Turul statue. But there is also a ‘cuckoo egg‘ – you can sneak peek Ratatuielle, the gastrorat, watching graffiti in Döbrentei square.

The latest one is near the Várkert Bazár and tells a story about a film from 1965, The Corporal and The Others. There is a well-known phrase from the movie: “Russians are already in the pantry!” Sadly, it is still a current and essential subject to this day. The name of the statue is nincs kompót; in English, there is no compote!

Statues in Pest

In Pest, there are more statues, permanently 21, but we are pretty sure there will be more in the near future. There is a lot, so we only list our favourite ones.

In Budapest, it is hard to find a statue that represents women. That was why Kolodko filled this gap with miniature art about Hanna Szeles, poet, and war hero. She played an essential role in holding back the deportation of Jews. The artwork is on Szenes Hanna square.

If you discover the downtown and wander around the Szabadság square, be observant because you can find Kermit the Frog from the Muppet show hidden next to a fence. It was a popular show in Hungary, and for many people, it has a pleasant nostalgic factor.

It’s common knowledge that Budapest gives space to the Dohany Street Synagogue, the biggest Neolog Synagogue in Europe. So from this point of view, it’s understandable why the artist created a tiny version of Theodor Herzl with his bike next to it.

There is also another metal art near the Synagogue. Next to the New York Caffee is a diver who holds a key. There is a legend that a long time ago, Ferenc Molnár, a Hungarian writer, threw the key into the Danube River because he didn’t want his favourite coffee place to shut down; that is why the divers guard the key for eternity.

In Falk Miksa Street, near the Columbo statue, there is a murder scene – at least Kolodko made one. There is a squirrel, who committed suicide with a gun, and now the famous detective can also figure out the mystery of this crime. He has time for it.

The 14-carat car is also a trendy artwork. You can find it on Hevesi Sándor square, in front of the Pesti Magyar Theatre. And don’t miss Noah’s Ark if you are in Bethlen Gábor square!
In Akácfa street, you can find Kispipa Bar & Food, and on the wall is a mini version of Seress Rezső composer who wrote the famous song Gloomy Sunday.

Check the updates if you want to see them all because Mihály Kolodko doesn’t rest. Maybe when I’m writing, he is creating another beautiful statue and hiding it somewhere in Budapest; who knows?
If you want to visit Budapest and discover the most famous Kolodko mini statues, don’t hesitate to contact me. Let’s explore the city together!